Events

All events are free and open to the public



Spring Term 2015



Thursday, February 12, 2015, 5 pm
Creative Buddhas, Gnosticism, and Pure Lands in Tibet: The Great Perfection Seminal Heart Tradition from the Unimpeded Sound Tantra to Longchenpa
2015 Khyentse Lecture

David Germano, Department of Religious Studies, University of Virginia
Toll Room, Alumni House
Co-sponsored by the Khyentse Foundation

2015 Khyentse Lecture

The Great Perfection (rdzogs chen) is historically one of the most creative developments to emerge in Tibetan Buddhism and Bön religious traditions. In the Buddhist forms, the classical history runs from the ninth to thirteenth centuries and culminates in the fourteen century corpus of Longchenpa. A dramatic transformation occurred from the eleventh century onwards with the emergence of the Seminal Heart (snying thig) form of the Great Perfection with the radically innovative Unimpeded Sound Tantra (sgra thal 'gyur). The external markers of this transformation are clear: contemplative and ritual practices abound in a tradition previously marked by their absence, a plethora of new tantric themes, a complex set of new narrative traditions, and a systematic philosophical discourse ranging over a broad array of topics. These developments were elaborated in a body of visionary revelations in the twelfth century and then systematized in the fourteenth century writings of Longchenpa. This talk will examine the inner dynamic of this transformation and argue that at its heart is a model of divine creation modeled upon the efflorescence of pure lands from a divine Buddha's primordial gnosis (ye shes, jñāna). These innovations, while extensive and intrinsically Tibetan in character, are clearly just as deeply grounded in the minutiae of Indian Buddhist thought, practice, and narrative, and constitute probably the most interesting strand in the larger Tibetan fashioning of a philosophical tantra movement. We will look at nine different contexts — cosmogony through eschatology — in which this model is apparent.

 

Wednesday, March 11, 2015, 5-7 pm
Transactional Reality and the Regimes of Truth
Sara McClintock, Department of Religion, Emory University
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall
Co-sponsored by the Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion and the Center for Buddhist Studies


Saturday, March 21, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
The Sixth International Ryūkoku Symposium on Buddhism and Japanese Culture
Speakers:
 •  Yukio Kusaka, Professor of the Department of Japanese Literature,
     Ryukoku University
 •  Sei Noro, Lecturer of the Department of Buddhist Studies, Ryukoku
     University
 •  Jijun Yoshida, Adjunct Lecturer of the Department of Buddhist Studies,
     Ryukoku University
 •  Takahiko Kameyama, Former Postdoctoral Research Fellow of Institute of
     Buddhist Studies
 •  "Tatsuo" Florian Saile, Buddhist Studies Graduate Student, UC Berkeley;
     Koufukuji Temple Monk
 •  Mark Blum, Buddhist Studies and Shinjo Ito Distinguished Professor in
     Japanese Studies, UC Berkeley
Jodo Shinshu Center, 2140 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704
Sponsored by the Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of Buddhist Studies, Ryukoku University

SCHEDULE
Each talk will last 50 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of Q&A

Morning Session | 9:00AM-12:00PM (will be conducted in Japanese)

1. 真宗の唱道勧化本について
日下幸男氏(龍谷大学文学部教授)
Revealing the Teachings: Popular Sermons (shōdō kange bon 唱道勧化本) in Shin Buddhism
Yukio Kusaka
(Professor of the Department of Japanese Literature, Ryukoku University)

2. 日本華厳における「論義」について
野呂 靖氏(龍谷大学文学部専任講師)
"Doctrinal Debate" (rongi 論義) in Kegon School
Sei Noro
(Lecturer of the Department of Buddhist Studies, Ryukoku University)

3. 初期日本天台における他宗との論争
吉田慈順氏(龍谷大学文学部非常勤講師)
Early Tendai Buddhist Disputes with Other Schools
Jijun Yoshida
(Adjunct Lecturer of the Department of Buddhist Studies, Ryukoku University)

BREAK

Afternoon Session | 2:00-5:00PM (will be conducted in English)

4. 中世真言密教における「信」
亀山隆彦氏(前IBS博士研究員)
The Significance of "Faith" in Medieval Shingon Buddhism
Takahiko Kameyama
(Ex-Postdoctoral Research Fellow of Institute of Buddhist Studies)

5. 日本中世の法相教学の展開―法相論義における「一乗」の解釈を中心として―
The One or the Three, the One and the Three, and/or the One as the Three: Observations on the Evolution of the Relationship between the 'Single Vehicle' and the 'Three Vehicles' in Medieval Japanese Hossō Thought
"Tatsuo" Florian Saile
(Buddhist Studies Graduate Student, UC Berkeley; Koufukuji Temple Monk)

6. 講演: Contextualizing Posthumous Kaimyō Ritual in Japan: Indian and Chinese Precedents for Renaming the Dead.
Mark Blum
(Buddhist Studies and Shinjo Ito Distinguished Professor in Japanese Studies, UC Berkeley)

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415


Friday-Saturday, April 17-18, 2015
When Modernity Hits Hard: Redefining Buddhism in Meiji-Taisho-Early Shōwa Japan
Speakers:
 •  Mark Blum, UC Berkeley
 •  Melissa Curley, University of Iowa
 •  Jessica Main, University of British Columbia
 •  John Maraldo, Indiana University
 •  Ama Michihiro, University of Alaska Anchorage
 •  Yoshinaga Shin’ichi, Maizuru National College of Technology
 •  George Tanabe, University of Hawaiʻi
Moderators:
 •  Jim Heisig, Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture
 •  Richard Jaffe, Duke University
Jodo Shinshu Center, 2140 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704
Co-sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies, Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai

When Modernity Hits Hard: Redefining Buddhism in Meiji-Taisho-Early Shōwa Japan

This conference aims to present new research on the turbulent period between the Meiji Restoration and the onset of full-scale warfare in 1931 when the central government of Japan expressed open hostility toward Buddhism for the first time since its introduction in the 6th century. These papers explore various efforts made in response to powerful pressures to redefine Buddhism's place in a redefined Japanese society.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415