Recent Webcasts

2019 Numata Symposium Webcast - Buddhist Philosophy: The State of the Field

October 24, 2019

2019 Numata Symposium to Celebrate the 35th Anniversary of the Numata Chair Program at UC Berkeley.

2018 Toshihide Numata Book Award Presentation and Symposium ‘Meaning in the World and in Texts’: Thoughts on Buddhist Philosophy of Language

November 9, 2018

The Toshihide Numata Book Award in Buddhism is awarded on an annual basis to an outstanding book or books in the area of Buddhist studies. The selection is made by an external committee that is appointed annually. This year's winner is Professor Roy Tzohar (Tel Aviv University) for his book A Yogācāra Buddhist Theory of Metaphor (Oxford University Press).

Migrants, Monks, and Monasteries: Toward a History of South China Sea Buddhism

March 8, 2018

Jack Meng-Tat Chia is a Senior Tutor in the Department of History at the National University of Singapore and currently a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Center for Buddhist Studies, University of California, Berkeley. Born and raised in Singapore, he received his MA in East Asian Studies from Harvard University, and his PhD in History from Cornell University. He is currently working on his book manuscript, entitled Diaspora's Dharma: Buddhism and Modernity across the South China Sea.

2018 Khyentse Lecture - Buddhism and Divination in Tibet

February 8, 2018

In Tibet, various forms of divination persist both within and alongside the Buddhist and Bon religions. Excavated divination texts from Dunhuang and from other Silk Road sites furnish us with traces of the dynamic processes by which Buddhism absorbed various divination techniques practiced in 8th to 10th centuries.

Buddhism, Mind, and Cognitive Science

April 25, 2014

This conference was made possible by a grant from The Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation and is dedicated to the exploration of the methodological underpinnings of the current encounter between Buddhism and cognitive science.

2012 Khyentse Lecture - Tibet in the Age of Manuscripts: Reflections on Recent Textual Discoveries

February 16, 2012

During the past few decades, the discovery, cataloguing, and partial publication of important Tibetan manuscript collections has substantially transformed our view of the intellectual and religious history of Tibet. Important developments about which we were almost entirely ignorant only a decade ago may now be studied in detail thanks to copious newly available documentation.