Current Fellows

Xingyi Wang

Title: Sheng Yen Postdoctoral Fellow in Chinese Buddhism (2021-2023)
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Xingyi Wang was the 2021-2023 Sheng Yen Postdoctoral Fellow of Chinese Buddhism. Her research includes Buddhist monasticism, Vinaya studies, and Buddhist ethics. Born and raised in China, she received her MTS (2015) from Harvard Divinity School and Ph.D. (2021) from Harvard University. Her dissertation focuses on the commentarial tradition of the Dharmaguptaka Vinaya and the formation of the Vinaya School through the cultural exchanges between Song China and Kamakura Japan. During her stay at UC Berkeley, she is expected to explore topics on Buddhist monasticism in the Yuan Dynasty.

Jed Forman

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

Title: Shinjo Ito Postdoctoral Fellow in Buddhist Studies (2021-2023)
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Jed Forman received his undergraduate degree in philosophy from Tufts University with a special certificate in Ethics, Law, and Society. After a seven-year stint as a computer programmer and street dancer—performing and teaching in New York, LA, and internationally—Jed received his M.S. with distinction in Kinesiology and Dance from California State University Northridge, where his research focused on flow states. He thereafter returned to his interest in Buddhist philosophy and entered the religious studies doctoral program at University of California Santa Barbara. He conducted research in India for some fifteen months on both Fulbright and American Institute for Indian Studies grants, completing his doctorate in 2021. His research focuses on Buddhist epistemology, particularly Gelug interpretations of Dignāga, Dharmakīrti, and other Indian predecessors. In addition to several publications, Jed is a co-author on a forthcoming monograph with the Yakherds entitled Knowing Illusion, which investigates Taktsang Lotsāwa's unique critique of the Gelug school. Jed continues to publish translations as well as his own research, also drawing from cognitive science and Western phenomenology. His in-progress monograph examines theories of yogic perception across Indian and Tibetan traditions.

Marta Sanvido

Title: Shinjo Ito Postdoctoral Fellow in Buddhist Studies (2021-2022)
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Marta Sanvido is a Shinjo Ito Postdoctoral fellow in Japanese Buddhism at UC Berkeley. Before moving to Berkeley, Dr. Sanvido worked as an adjunct professor of Japanese Language and Culture at Ca’Foscari University of Venice (a.a. 2019-2020). She earned a Ph.D. in Japanese religions from the same university in 2019. During her doctoral years, she conducted two years of fieldwork in Japanese temples and archives with the generous support of the Ca’Foscari International Bursary and the Japan Foundation Doctoral Fellowship. Sanvido’s research interests lie in the intersection of different types of knowledge emerging from Zen medieval and early modern secret textual corpus. Her dissertation traced the intellectual history of medieval and early modern Sōtō school. It focused in particular on the development of different Sōtō Zen branches and their connection with the broader context of the Japanese cultural milieu as depicted in secret manuals and accounts exchanged between the 14th to the 18th century. At UC Berkeley, she is working to shape her doctoral thesis into a book manuscript. Her first book project aims at shedding light on the dynamics of secrecy in premodern Japan by exploring a wide variety of sources such as secret texts, literary works, mythological narratives, and historical records. Dr. Sanvido is interested in a broad range of topics that include mountain religiosity, divinatory practices, women and gender, medieval Prince Shо̄toku cult, hagiography, local female deities, mythological discourses, Song-period Neo-Confucianism in Japan, and medieval medicine.